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Utah's Foremost Platform for Undergraduate Research Presentation

Social and Behavioral Sciences

November 19, 2020 11:29 PM
Hadli Gates, Dixie State University
November 19, 2020 07:32 PM
Bridget Baldwin, Utah State University
November 19, 2020 07:15 PM
Sayro Paw, University of Utah
November 19, 2020 11:08 AM
Kimberly Jones, Utah State University The purpose of my research project is to analyze the ethics of what prevents assistive technology from being used for children and adults with multiple disabilities. A person with multiple disabilities by definition cannot perform a number of everyday functions on their own, leaving them to rely entirely on others. The parents of these individuals, as well as their lawmakers, have historically been opposed to new assistive technologies for these individuals for a variety of reasons. I am going to examine why parents and lawmakers may be opposed and how different ethical frameworks can suggest solutions to these problems. In particular, I will use two ethical frameworks to look at this issue. The first is the ethics of care as described by Joan Tronto. This ethical framework is especially fitting because individuals with multiple disabilities by definition cannot care for themselves; they rely entirely on care from others. I will research how care, which is framed as trying to better the world around you, is being used for them already and see where it might be lacking. Care is all about community and recognizing as well as fulfilling the needs of others. The second framework I will use is virtue ethics as described by Shannon Vallor. Virtue ethics is all about self-cultivating certain virtues in order to live a good life. I am going to examine how assistive technology may allow individuals with multiple disabilities to cultivate virtues for themselves in ways they never could before, as well as how other people involved in making decisions for them (such as parents and lawmakers) may feel compelled to allow assistive technology or may feel compelled to ban it based on their virtues. This framework helps expand the research into a place it’s never gone before by asking certain questions that have never been asked. Such questions would be: what is different about cultivating virtues in oneself compared to in a person with multiple disabilities? How does care ethics suggest the community look at the situation and handle these individuals who rely so wholly on others? Where does this assistive technology fit into these frameworks and how does it change the way we have done things for these individuals in the past? I do not want to look at this issue in a binary way; rather, I want to ask questions that have not been asked before and see where they lead.
November 18, 2020 09:04 PM
Sidney Cushing, University of Utah
November 17, 2020 01:38 PM
Jane Etherington, University of Utah
November 16, 2020 11:01 PM
Logan Ashworth, Southern Utah University
November 12, 2020 01:34 PM
Sophie A. George; Christena Jensen; Sarah Janson; Miguel Diaz; Chantel Sloan, Dixie State University
October 29, 2020 07:39 PM
Hailey Boggess, Utah Valley University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Madelaine Campbell, Brigham Young University This research looks at Britain’s release of her former colonies during the 20th century, and the motivations behind their actions. South Africa moved towards unification in 1908 with Britain’s support in the drafting of the South Africa Act and Lord Selbourne’s involvement in the National Convention. By examining original communications within the British government regarding South Africa and the parliamentary papers surrounding the South Africa Act the British motivation towards its former colonies becomes apparent. In this case study of South Africa’s movement towards independence, we see that Britain wanted to give as much control to the South African delegates as possible without relinquishing their hold on the natural resources and strong leadership that South Africa provided. In their quest to maintain a good relationship with South Africa, Britain overlooked some of the damaging decisions made by the South African leaders which led to racial and class conflict in South Africa later, during the rest of the 20th century.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Erin Kaseda, Brigham Young University Background: It is estimated that between 5-10% of children and adolescents in the United States have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). For adolescents with ADHD, parent-child relationships experience increased conflict and poorer parenting practices. Interpersonal difficulties among both peers and family members put children with ADHD at risk for comorbid disorders, including depression and anxiety. Very little research has been done on children’s own perception of parental support or on the strength of parent’s marital quality as mediating factors on the negative symptomology of ADHD. The project will bridge this gap in the current literature. Methods: 10 adolescents aged 14-19 (M=17, N= 7 female, 3 male) with an official diagnosis of ADHD completed surveys and participated in a semi-structured interview. Participants were asked questions about self-control in school and in home settings, how their relationship with their parents influence their self-control, and their overall perceptions of their parent-child relationships. The interviews were transcribed and coded for factors that improve or hinder adolescents’ comfort in confiding in or sharing their feelings with their parents. Results: Participants were mostly white (50%) or Latino/a (40%) and from middle to high income families (100%). When asked how comfortable they felt sharing their feelings with or confiding in their parents, 33% of subjects reported feeling very comfortable, 40% somewhat comfortable, and 27% as not comfortable. When asked who they tend to go to for advice or support, 30% of subjects reported that there is no one that they are likely to go to. Participants also reported on specific actions their parents take that make it more difficult for them to confide in them. Responses included, ‰ÛÏI can’t tell them the things I feel guilty about‰Û_it’s scary;‰Û ‰ÛÏIf they give me advice that I think [was] a little bit too judgmental, I’ll probably not come back to them;‰Û and ‰ÛÏThere’s just kind of a difference in perspective.‰Û Conclusions: Understanding adolescents’ own perception of parental support and factors that make it difficult for them to confide in their parents has significant potential for clinicians in creating family-based interventions and therapies for adolescents with ADHD. Additionally, the finding that a third of subjects do not have peers or other adults that they feel comfortable going to for support is significant for school-based interventions. Further research needs to be done on the differences in social network size between adolescents with ADHD and their typically developing peers.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Daniel Allred, Utah Valley University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Debra K Wing; Mike Mcneil; Camry Shawcroft, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jazmine Hurley, University of Utah
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Tessa Brunnenmeyer, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Sarai Holbrook; Kate Scott; Tristin Hampshire; Hailey Ashcroft; Megan Israelsen, Utah State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Paul Consalvo; Amy Carmellini; Nikki Quinney; Travis Whitfield; Caleb Buahin, Utah State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Diehl Mutamba, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Luke Ekstrom, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Juan Valladares; Hanna Prieto; Niyeli Herrera; Yerenia Flores, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Shay Bauman, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Mikala Lowrance, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Luke Tuttle, University of Utah
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Candy Roland, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jake Rowley, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Mandy Parsons, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Kelsie Orton, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Alexander Cipro, University of Utah
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Aubrey Passey; Kennedi Eggertsen; Becca Polson, Utah State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Brayden Ross, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jodi Shegrud, Weber State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Brian Allen, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Trevor Tonks, Utah Valley University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Madeline Peterson; Alison Barlow; Natalie Green; Madison Horrocks, Utah State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Xela Armstrong, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Steiner Houston; Carrie Stone; Eric Young, Weber State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Melissa Swedin, University of Utah
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Morgan Millar; Kyl Myers; David Turok; Zoe Kozlowski; Jessica Sanders; Matt Pierce, University of Utah
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Sam Cook, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Rachel Stoddard, Brigham Young University