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Utah's Foremost Platform for Undergraduate Research Presentation

Education

Methods and Utility of Passive Cooling in Molten Salt Reactors During Accident Conditions

February 19, 2021 12:00 PM
Presenter: Brent Edgerton, Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Evaluating mood in aphasia: Measurement tools and group differences

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Morgan Smith, McKay School of Education, Communication Disorders

Disentangling Instructor Traits From Pedagogical Methods as Valued by General Education Geography Students

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Chloe Macdonald, College of Earth Science, Geography

Sustaining Belonging in the In Between through Physical Storytelling

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: L. Kate Blair, College of Arts and Sciences, Dance and Education

Dynamic Assessment of Language: Reporting Evidence of Validity from a Large-Scale Study

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Tori Rydalch, McKay School of Education, Communication Disorders

Changes in Grammaticality in Bilingual Children

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Tess Owens, David O. McKay School of Education, Communication Disorders

Can Culture be Taught in the Pandemic World Through Remote Learning?

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenters: Emmaline Rawlinson, College of Education, Elementary Education

Bibliotherapy in Practice

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenters: Emily Reed, David O. McKay School of Education, Counseling Psychology and Special Education

The Fight for Diversity: Marketing Diversity in Higher Education and its Misleading Impacts on Incoming Students at the U of U

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Alessandra Cipriani-Detres, Honors College & College of Humanities, International Studies

Using Animoji to Teach Social Emotional Learning to Students With ASD

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenters: Dallin Hendry, College of Family, Home and Social Sciences, Psychology

Clinical Practically of Nonword Repetition Tasks for Language Assessment of Bilingual Children

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Katherine Harris, McKay School of Education, Communication Disorders

Bias and Racism: The Effects on our ELL Students

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Emma Eversole, College of Education, Elementary Education

Translanguaging and School-Community Partnerships

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Calli Keeling, Mckay School of Education, Elementary Education

"Botley, you have to listen!"- Exploring young children's interactions with robots while learning to code

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenters: Selendra Lewis, College of Science, Biology

Application Design for Post-Secondary Education Planning

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenter: Joseph Wassweiler, College of Architecture and Planning, Multidisciplinary Design

SEEd Pods

February 19, 2021 12:00 AM
Presenters: Katherine Elliott, Education, Elementary Education

Laboratory safety misconceptions among first year chemistry students.

November 16, 2020 10:43 PM
Daniel Sullivan, Dixie State University

Tracking Statistics in New Grade Level Program

November 02, 2020 10:07 AM
Gareth Houston-McMillan, Dixie State University

Documenting a Foreign Language Teaching, Learning, and Retention Experience

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Rachel Fuller, Brigham Young University

From the Eyes of ELLs

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Dakota Halley; Stephanie Johnstone; Andrea Deever; Cassidie Medina; Kimberly Child, Dixie State University

Defining “Special” In Special Education

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Sydnee Higginson, Brigham Young University

A Case Study Investigating the Impact of a Summer MS to PhD Bridge Program on the Science Identities of Underrepresented Minority Students.

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Mark Albrecht; Kristin Wilson-Grimes; Sennai Habtes, Southern Utah University

“The Greatest Equalizer”: Education and its Impacts in Otutati, Namibia

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Katherine Safsten, Brigham Young University

SHELL Tutors Teaching Literacy Through Culture

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Keanna Graff, Dixie State University

Bringing Rigor to Reading: How Young Learners Can Benefit From Better Books

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Peyton Carter, Southern Utah University

Computationally Efficient Generation of Adversarial Images for Deep Learning

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Frost Mitchell, Utah State University

Evaluating the effectiveness of Comprehensive versus Risk-Avoidance Sexual Education Curriculum in Northern Utah

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Alyson Rasmussen; Ellen Seely; Valentina Pastrana, Weber State University

Aggies Global Observatory

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Catherine Miner, Utah State University

Demonstration as Instructional Tool

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jessie Byers, Southern Utah University

Physical Activity Education for Refugees Resettled in Utah

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Mandy Robison, University of Utah

Overload

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Sarah Kay Miller, Brigham Young University

Understanding Parental Attitudes toward Abstinence Based and Comprehensive based Sexual Health Topics in Northern Utah

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Laura Pastrana; Alyson Rasmussen; Ellen Seely; Jeralyn Perkins, Weber State University

Learner-centered Teaching: A Historical Example

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Evan Sharp, Brigham Young University

The Effect of Algebra on Critical Thinking Skills of Students

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Edgar Judd, Southern Utah University

Organizational Learning in Inpatient Hospitals: A Systematic Review of the Literature

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jonathan Jacobs; Emily Hammond; Maggie Gunn, Brigham Young University

Student Perceptions of Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Teamwork

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jonathan Jacobs, Brigham Young University

Are Humans Just Animals? A Study of the Acceptance of Evolution

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Chad Talbot, Utah Valley University

The Possibilities of Dance-History Integration in Education

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Kathleen Fotheringham, Southern Utah University

Grammatical and Narrative Content Adequacy in Story Retells Told by Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Before, During and After Narrative Instruction

January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Emily Kunz, Shea Long, Melany Reeder, and Brigid Crotty, Utah State University Education It has been proposed that asking a child to make up their own story, rather than to retell a story, is a more stringent test of narrative ability and may tax the linguistic system revealing weaknesses not apparent in less difficult contexts (eg., retelling stories). At least one study has shown that children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience content-form tradeoffs as they master narrative discourse (DeLucchi, Fricke, Kaye, Crotty and Gillam, 2015). The content-form tradeoff was observed when children with ASD with typical grammatical skills and poor narrative proficiency were shown to experience significant grammatical difficulties as they mastered narrative discourse. The purpose of this study was to determine whether content-form trade-offs were observed in stories children with ASD were asked to retell. Five children with ASD ranging in age from 9-12 were asked to retell stories weekly, during a baseline and narrative treatment period over the course of 12-16 weeks. The stories were scored for grammaticality and narrative proficiency. Story retells were observed to be grammatical whether elicited during baseline, early, mid or later treatment sessions. Children with lower language skills experienced times when they were completely unable to recall a story, particularly early on in instruction, although when they did, they experienced good grammatical accuracy. Children with higher language skills were always able to remember parts of the story and were highly grammatical. The story model (retell) may make it less difficult for students with ASD to focus on and remember content while also maintaining grammatical accuracy.

Why Do Action Research as a T eacher? Improving Mathematics Teaching and Learning

January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Kristine Jolley, Brigham Young University Education This research-in-progress examines the role of action research in teacher movement toward reform-based mathematics education during a sustained professional development initiative. This initiative, which provided coursework for the Utah Elementary Mathematics Endorsement (UEME), was implemented as a Brigham Young University/Alpine School District partnership collaboration. Although the UEME is offered at several sites across Utah as a major state professional development initiative in mathematics education, our collaboration was unique in incorporating action research as a major component. We pose and seek to answer the following question: What happens to teachers’ knowledge and theories regarding reform-based mathematics education as they engage in action research on a reform-based mathematics education practice of their choice in their classrooms? We have examined data collected from three cohorts of participants over the 4-year duration of the grant; each participant was involved for 2 years. Of the 53 participants, 12 (4 from each cohort) were purposefully selected according to pre- and post-measures of participants’ mathematics beliefs, knowledge, and practice as well as the dimensions of gender, ethnicity, professional assignment, and years of teaching experience. Qualitative analysis of relevant data from these participants is contributing to our understanding of the role of action research in teacher movement toward reform-based mathematics education. We are currently writing the analysis section of a manuscript based on these data. Recognition of the need for improvement in mathematics teaching and learning is not new, yet implementing the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics adds a new layer of challenge. This in-depth study of action research as a professional development practice should inform decision-making regarding the inclusion of action research in subsequent Endorsement programs as well as in other professional development initiatives. Further, this study should add its own unique contribution to the research conversation on a broader scale.

Children’s Misconceptions about Space and What Needs to be Done About It

January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Raschelle Davis, Dixie State University Education The general populace in America has many misconceptions concerning space; this is due to lack of explicit, clear education. As children grow and observe the world around them they can create misconceptions about how things work. Research shows that this is particularly true when children are learning about space (Brunsell and Marcks, 2007). Many of these misconceptions can be corrected or avoided if the teacher has specific knowledge of the science content and how to teach it (Bulunuz and Jarrett, 2009). As a mother of a young boy I have been asked many questions about space and how it all works. I was never sure how I should answer those questions, since I did not fully understand how it worked myself. This past year I became involved in a NASA astronomy project in my teacher education program that teaches space science to students using a hands-on approach. During my first astronomy event I could not help but be amazed with the questions and the confusion that some of the students had about space while looking through the telescopes. This gave me the desire to learn more about space and teaching children about space. This research project explores children’s misconceptions about space, the problems with how children are currently being taught about space, and how students could more effectively be taught about space in order to reach clear understanding.

Bold Talk for a One-Eyed Fat Man: The Importance of Classic Western Literature in the Contemporary Classroom

January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Are classic, young-adult novels set in the American west a dead genre in the American classroom? Despite its historical impact on popular culture, young-adult novels set in the American west have seen a considerable decline in relevance in American public schools. While classic young-adult literature receiving heavy rotation in current young-adult classrooms, as well as young-adult literature published in the current century, may have its place, Western, young-adult literature published in the 1960’s and 1970’s should still be read, taught, critiqued and celebrated. The general argument against including western, young-adult literature on the reading lists of public schools in the western states, where, arguably they should be the most prevalent, is that the texts are significantly passé and therefore not relevant to contemporary secondary students. While the majority of criticism in favor of western literature is also dated, this paper makes the argument that although the texts and various criticisms may seem behind the times, it should also be taken into account that present-day society is remarkably similar to society when the texts were initially published. Interestingly, not only is present-day society similar to society in the late 1960’s and 1970’s, but a recent interest in regionalism as opposed to vast commercialism also seems to be making an impact on society. By presenting literature that draws attention to the history of a local area, a literary gap created by an interest in who we were as a society and where we came from may be filled. The research conducted takes the classic, western, young-adult novel, True Grit by Charles Portis and that text with a more popular and more contemporary novel, The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton. It’s through this comparison we are able to appreciate and understand the relevance of classic Western literature in the contemporary classroom.