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Utah's Foremost Platform for Undergraduate Research Presentation

Fine Arts

January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Harris, Anna (Brigham Young University)

I am a scholar, a future educator, and Utah woman exploring how to create a better future classroom. This last summer, I studied a person's influence on people and their relationship to the environment through traveling, painting, and talking to people in Scotland and the Faroe Islands. Through observation and communicating with local dwellers and other travelers, I learned more about the individual impact people have as well as the societal impact that can change landscapes. In the paintings: “Shetland Morning” and “Hillside Climbs”, I illustrated some of the subtle changes that we have made on otherwise natural landscapes giving both positive and negative impressions that we, as a whole, are leaving on the world. Traveling Scotland allowed me to have conversation after conversation with people of different socioeconomic status, different levels of learning, and in different stages of life. It taught me that I, a Utah Woman and teacher in the making, can make a difference.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
King, Alise (Utah State University)

I emphasize the strength and grit of Ann H. Davis who had crippling feet deformities which caused her to walk on the outsides of her feet, and her determined ability to walk, what today would be a 1,320-mile drive by car. Ann H. Davis was born in 1823 in Wales and traveled to America in 1854. It is said that Ann insisted on walking the majority of the way, rarely taking time for a rest in the wagons. She came with her daughter to Logan, Utah in 1859 from St. Louis. She met and married David W. Davis in Wellsville, Utah and gave birth to two other daughters as well as twins. Ann was a dress maker and raised cattle and sheep. She was also a Relief Society worker for 9 years. I chose to focus my project on Ann H. Davis because of her courage and ability to accomplish something so mentally and physically daunting, in-spite of her physical challenges.

Four of the five prints are created from digital negatives and exposed on salt paper prints. Salt paper printing is a technique created during the 19th century. The larger fifth print is a digital image, portraying Ann H. Davis’ feet. All prints are mounted on aluminum backing. Information about Ann H. Davis came from the Daughter of Utah Pioneers Logan Museum.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Paraso, Raven (Utah Valley University)

A critical analysis of Dreams by Anna Sokolow from a psychoanalytical perspective, focusing on Freud’s Dream Theory, will demonstrate how the Holocaust played a role on the unconscious of Sokolow and her chorographic choices.

On January 30, 1933 Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany. In America around the same time, a Jewish dancer named Anna Sokolow was making a name for herself in the dance community. This research will demonstrate how the Holocaust had an impact on Sokolow’s unconscious and her chorographic choices in her work titled Dreams. The psychoanalytical perspective, specifically Dream Theory invokes the idea that the unconscious can influence and motivate behavior through dreams without the conscious mind being aware. Anna Sokolow’s unconscious could have been affected by the events of the Holocaust, which could have influenced her to create Dreams without her conscious mind knowing what Dreams is truly about. Anna Sokolow’s unconscious mind could have been affected by the Holocaust because she is a Jew living during a time of Genocide to her people. Dreams was choreographed by Anna Sokolow with the original intent of showing the horrors people see in their dreams because she was experiencing terrifying dreams at the time. She was unaware of the underlying meaning of these dreams until later when she realized her dreams were a personal response to the events of the Holocaust.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Patchett, Gianna (Utah State University)The definition for the word “inspiration” is ever changing and has various meanings depending on the individual, culture, and time period. My goal is to compare the ideas about inspiration from the 19th century and the modern day. As an example of this I will look at Johannes Brahms’s Cello Sonata No. 1 in E Minor and, using what I have learned about inspiration, search for possible sources of inspiration for that particular composition. I will also discuss the way in which this research influenced my own interpretation and performance of the work.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Richardson, Harriet (Brigham Young University)I am a Utah woman studying photography, and therefore many of my subjects are also Utah women. As I have gotten to research, interact with, and create art with so many unique women, I have come to learn of their stories and experiences. Woman are not only beautiful, but strong and capable beyond comprehension. In my little corner of Utah, many people come and go and presence can be fleeting. Despite this, the similarity between all these women, including myself, is that no matter how much or how little time we spend here, Utah becomes a part of our story and our womanhood. What we learn here, who we meet here, what we create here comes together to enhance us as individuals and the community as a whole. Whether it be through politics, arts, family, or just general life experience – being a Utah women sticks with us and our stories.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Sommers, Taryn; Veon, Raymond (Utah State University)A literature search of research and academic journals suggests that there are few critical examinations of LDS visual culture in visual culture research. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the types of gender roles portrayed in contemporary LDS visual culture, the visual codes used to represent these gender roles, and the degree to which the representations of gender used in LDS visual culture align with findings in related visual culture studies. The result of this study will be a description of the current visual strategies used by the LDS church to represent gender roles, a thematic analysis of these visual strategies, and suggestions for future research into the ways that the LDS church visually defines gender in relation to existing trends and themes in visual culture research. The scope will include: “Mormon Ads,” images used in the LDS magazine, “Ensign,” and conference memes used during the years 2016-2019. This will contribute to the field of visual culture and gender studies by examining the visual codes used by the LDS church to portray the role and status of males and females as represented in current LDS visual culture, determining the strategies used in these representations, and discussing the potential research implications of these findings in light of themes in visual culture gender studies. Some research questions are: What visual codes are used in the representation of males, females, and mixed-sex groups in current LDS visual culture? What types of roles and status do these visual codes convey pertaining to the representation of males, females, and mixed-sex groups in current LDS visual culture? What extent do the results of investigating the above research questions align with other research findings in gender and visual culture studies? The methods used in this research will be 1) an inventory of discrete visual codes (e.g. color use, affect/expression, clothing/dress, setting, etc.) used in the LDS visual culture samples, and 2) a separate thematic analysis of the sample will also be conducted. The results of both methods will be compared, analyzed, and discussed in light of current trends in visual culture gender research. While the results of this research are expected to demonstrate that LDS visual culture will emphasize and reinforce traditional gender roles of females as mothers and homemakers and males as leaders and providers, it is hoped that this study will reveal strategies related to gender role representation unique to LDS culture.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Trounce, Mitch (Utah Valley University)I've noticed an increasing number of people wearing articles of clothing that sport the name of companies that focus on an entirely different product. It's funny and interesting to me seeing people so fixated on wearing a vintage Pepsi or Marlboro jacket. My art piece is my foot in the door to this trend of wearing non clothing brands as a form of fashion. I want to further explore this idea by creating an entire portfolio of faux non clothing brands.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Willes, Bailey (Westminster College)Crude concentrates on the naturally occurring tar seeps at Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake. This is the site of past fossil fuel drilling, and recently of scientific research. Though capped after drilling ended, the seeps continue to affect the natural environment. Research on the seeps attempts to understand their behavior as well as the relationship that we have with them. Similarly, the physical production of Crude explores the processes by which we connect to the earth through dependence and the subsequent vulnerability that this creates due to volatility. Scientific inquiries are posited abstractly through the process of creation and working with varying viscosities and mediums, focusing on dilution and impurities – all of which achieve different textural results. The utilization of found objects from the seeps was integral to recall the historic and nostalgic, tying the stoicism of the seeps past with familiarity and personal memory. Dependence and comfort are dichotomized with the enigmatic threat of natural forces, and the destruction caused by the seeps is of expressed interest in this creation.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Hogan, Jake. Omasta, Matt. James, Nicole. Sase, Tanner. Felty, Aubrey. Lewis, Cassidy. Nielson, Madi. (Utah State University)The goal of this project is to create a devised theatre performance by and about LGBTQIA+ people in Cache County. The project is essential because it creates a sense of inclusion for participants, promotes a better understanding of LGBTQIA+ people for audience members, and creates the notion these individuals’ stories deserve to be shared, understood, and valued. This project will be accomplished through an artistic theatrical process known as Devised Theatre. Devising is a subgroup of the larger genre of Applied Theatre, which attempts to promote and bring about social change through theatre. By doing this project, members of the LGBTQIA+ population in Cache Valley will have the opportunity to speak about and perform intricacies of the issues that they uniquely face. Challenging and overcoming oppression on college campuses is important for members of the LGBTQIA+ community and society more broadly.The central research question for this project is: “How do members of the LGBTQIA+ population in Utah’s Cache County understand, process, and interact with individuals and institutions they encounter on a regular basis?
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Huffcutt, Deanna (Brigham Young University)I was curious about the idea of movement within natural restraints. As women, we face natural restraints all the time. Most of our restraints are cultural and self-made, so this artwork explores that idea.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Huffcutt, Deanna (Brigham Young University)How does our perspective influence us? This piece, created out of wood and metal, is a walk-around piece with three different sides. Each side has a different perspective, though each piece is identical and only appears different due to placement. Our perspective greatly impacts our lives. As a woman living in Utah who did not grow up in Utah, I find that my perspective sometimes varies from the women around me. I am interested in the multitude of perspectives that exist in women in Utah, as I do not think it can be defined in one work of art.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Jackson, Erin; Root, Jerry; Kelly, Jessen (University of Utah)Approximately 250 extant manuscripts of the Romance of the Rose contain illuminations. The depicted scenes and motifs within these works follow established patterns, a notion that created several iconic scenes from the Romance that can be seen in nearly every illuminated manuscript. Issues of representation and interpretation of the Old French text come to light through the depictions in the images. Inversely, the conversation created between these aspects of the manuscripts emphasizes the ways in which the illuminations inform the understanding of the text. Scholarship focuses predominantly on the former of these visual-textual relationships, and considering the influence of the images on textual understanding will provide new insight into the creation of one of the most highly-produced manuscripts of the Medieval period. These relationships are examined through the depictions of the reoccurring Narcissus scene within the Romance. This research will result in the completion of an interdisciplinary Honors Thesis for both French and Art History. The Romance research focuses on the analysis of series of images throughout the manuscripts available in the Digital Library of Medieval Manuscripts run by John Hopkins University. This is accomplished through a combination of literary and art history approaches to form a more holistic understanding of the visual-textual relationship within the Romance of the Rose manuscripts.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Jessica Ketchum (Utah Valley University)As dance has moved into the world of Academia, dance researchers have adopted various theoretical research models to support the idea that dance is a reflection of culture. In addition, postmodern critical theorists have developed evidence that proves that dance is a product of the culture in which it is created. The New Historicism theoretical research model also makes ties between past world history and the dances that were created at that time, and assumes that dance is a direct reflection of the era in which it was produced. For example, the aftermath of WW1 lead to a drastic change in culture, economics, and politics throughout the world.(Brown) The reconfiguration of world economies and governmental powers lead to the popularization of Utopianism throughout the world. Many Americans believed in the establishment and development of Utopian communities. Utopianism is a perfect visionary reform and idealistic view of a commonwealth. (Britannica) It is the idea that all members of a community can work together to support one another economically to create peace and unity. Correspondingly, many authors and artists began experimenting with ideas of utopianism. Artist, Doris Humphrey, integrated common phenomenons of the society into her choreography. (Hahn 1:55) She used ideas of unity and reinforcing community in Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. This research analysis will discuss Doris Humphrey’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, from a New Historicism perspective and will argue that Humphrey’s choreographic choices for the piece were a direct reflection of the Utopian fixation in 20th century America.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Ackerman, Kristin (Utah State University)This project showcases unity between homemakers and women in the work force. I photographed women from all over Utah with different lifestyles to create a series that showcases the identity, power, and impact that womanhood has. Examining the natural qualities in women that unite them while also recognizing them each to have a unique set of strengths. During this process I photographed and interviewed women of different beliefs, backgrounds, ethnicities, age, and occupation in order to let them tell their story and understand what empowers them. This project goes beyond the empowerment of working women or homemakers, it allows all women to stand together as a community and union empowered in their identity celebrating their strengths.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Barker, Kirsten; Wheeler Roderer, Laurana (Utah State University)The collaborative nature of music, where individual action is essential to the success of the whole, provides a model which can affect viewpoints on climate change. This model has already been utilized in global environmentalist movements such as Greta Thunberg’s Fridays For Future. The collaborative approach taken in the creation of new pieces of music can be used to address climate change. We commissioned a chamber opera for three voices and string quartet that addresses the systemic issues surrounding the global climate emergency. The topic of our presentation will be the collaborative process involved in this project, specifically how we have reconciled the abstract nature of music and the technical jargon associated with scientific concepts.Opera can highlight and expound on the dramatic message of a text and also enhance its emotional undercurrent. For centuries, the powerful and elite considered opera to be a “high art” form because of these communicative abilities. By turning this context on its head, we used the genre to comment on the consumption-based systems that have led to and perpetuated our current climate crisis. This is especially relevant given the traditionally close ties between the fossil fuel industry and the fine arts in the United States (for example, the long sponsorship of New York’s Metropolitan Opera by Exxon-Mobil). In focusing on the idea of collaboration, this new piece of music becomes an exemplar of the efforts required to create a sustainable world.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Bennett, Amelie; Mattingly, Kate (University of Utah)This work examines the commonly accepted notion of dance/movement therapy that mirroring another person’s movement will increase both participants’ levels of empathy. Mirroring involves a participant creating expressive dance; in a therapeutic setting, the therapist mirrors their movements to establish a relationship and gain insight into their physical and emotional experience. This connection most likely results from the activation of mirror neurons in the premotor and parietal cortices. In this study, I examine the relationship between the mirror and the dancer, specifically regarding the relative increase in their empathy levels. I also examine how a participant’s empathy level changes when the participant has dance training. The purpose of this factorial structure is to determine under what circumstances a participant has the best chances of improving their empathy. This study is ongoing and will conclude in December 2019; I expect to see the greatest increase in empathy from mirroring participants who have dance training, although all participants should increase in empathy from pre- to post-testing. Although my sample size is small enough that this is a case study, and is not clinical, it lends insight into understanding under what circumstances a dance/movement therapist and patient pair have the best chance of optimizing the patient’s empathic growth. By studying the relationship between empathy and dance training, I also begin to examine whether preemptive treatment can be taken before signs of social-emotional deficits present; that is, if a specific form of dance training and mirroring improves empathy in a non-clinical or pre-clinical population.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Brock, Olivia (Utah State University)Astrolabes are astronomical computational instruments that developed in the Arabic-speaking world of the early Middle Ages. As both scientifically sophisticated and aesthetically beautiful objects, the astrolabe presents many interpretive questions regarding how historians of visual and material culture understand objects that exist across disciplines. My project seeks to understand how these historians have defined the astrolabe as an art historical and scientific object. Using a variety of methods, from examining the objects in a museum setting to experimenting with my own, homemade astrolabe, I have gained an understanding of the different identities of astrolabes. However, I found that these preconceived identities assigned to astrolabes has limited our understanding of the objects and thus controlled our subsequent research. Following this observation, I geared my research towards first, understanding the gap in knowledge that exists regarding the astrolabe’s complex identity, and second, working to fill this gap by creating a piece of literature that captures the astrolabe from all of its perspectives. My goal through this paper is to develop and portray a concept of the astrolabe as an artistic, astrological, religious, and scientific object, and interpret how all of these identities interact with each other to create an unusually specific and complex object. I hope that through the dissemination of my work I will be able to help scientists connect to art and artists connect to science through an object equally valuable to the history and development of both fields.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Davis, Kaily (Utah State University)Stories are often used to illustrate moral principles, and fables in specific do so through depictions of animals. Aesop's fables are some of the best known of these moral teachings, and have been in circulation since the late fifth century A.D. My research surrounds a 1711 edition of Aesop’s fables, titled “Aesop Naturaliz’d: in a Collection of Fable and Stories from Aesop, Locman, Pilpay, and Others”. This book was printed for Daniel Midwinter, a prominent English bookseller. I seek to understand both the context in which Midwinter was printing and selling books and the audience he was selling to. In discovering the audience intended to receive “Aesop Naturaliz’d”, I hope to understand the moral expectations placed upon that audience. In addition, I will compare the audience and morals taught by “Aesop Naturaliz'd” with modern re-tellings of the same fables, exploring the differences in moral expectations taught therein.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Marissa Devey (Utah State University)To those of us who are privileged enough to pad ourselves from the immediate consequences of global climate change, its reality remains an abstract and intangible problem. In the tropical cloud forests of Costa Rica, however, the effects of global warming are readily evident. My research aims to provide a narrative of climate change in the uniquely diverse and delicate cloud forest ecosystem, where I work in partnership with Ph.D. ecology student Jessica Murray. While Jessica uses sensors and datasets to quantify an intricate network of plants, animals, and microorganisms, my intent is to help non-scientists to visualize the implications of Jessica’s findings. My purpose is not to simplify or re-tell Jessica’s research, but to help the viewer connect with unfamiliar, abstract ideas in a visceral, internal way. I leverage paint, poetry, infographics, and abstraction to construct a metaphor for climate ecology: the human body. Working within this metaphor allows me to channel the viewer’s own physical, bodily experiences into an intimate portrait of ecological systems and their vulnerability to climate change. My goal is for viewers to become more conscious of their own ecology-- more aware of their dependence on the environment and more compassionate towards its components.
January 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Filip, Sofia (University of Utah)During the early 1900s, the rise of the American women’s suffrage movement coincided with a rise in contemporary theatre across vaudeville and Broadway stages. The work of George M. Cohan, an Irish American playwright, actor, producer and composer, grew to popularity throughout the United States during this time. With his emphasis on comedy and contemporary plots, Cohan’s plays, musicals, and songs revolutionized theatre and continue to influence modern artists. Much of Cohan’s work reflected social change and historical events such as feminism, immigration, political movements, World War I, and the Women’s Rights Movement. Although his portrayal of war, patriotism and immigrant identity is clearly stated throughout a number of Cohan’s plays, his messages about women, feminism and women’s suffrage are less obvious and change drastically throughout his career. Considering the popularity and extensive career Cohan held, examining these works for the portrayal of women enhances how we see the impact of Cohan’s work on society and vice versa. Specific pieces for this research were collected from the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, and various university archives. Manuscripts such as Little Johnny Jones, The Whispering Friend, and Little Nellie Kelly were examined for elements of women’s suffrage, feminism, and sexism, and span the length of Cohan’s career. Other materials such as interviews and sheet music were also analyzed for these elements. This research will examine the contextual portrayal of women, feminism and the women’s suffrage movement throughout the plays, musicals, and songs written by George M. Cohan. Lastly, it will also present any patterns and shifts in Cohan’s messages about women throughout his career.
November 19, 2020 07:02 PM
Hannah Waddel, University of Utah
November 19, 2020 06:34 PM
Rebecca Penn-Pierson, Utah Valley University
November 18, 2020 08:34 PM
Arden Laga, Utah Valley University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Kimberly Tarnasky, Kelli Egan, Brigham Young University The Dolly Gray Children’s Literature Award recognizes authors, illustrators, and publishers of high quality fictional and biographical children, intermediate, and young adult books that authentically portray individuals with developmental disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), intellectual disabilities, and Down syndrome. The Dolly Gray Children’s Literature Award was created to make an impact toward the general public’s recognition of the positive societal contributions of individuals with developmental disabilities, greater understanding and acceptance of teachers and school-aged peers of students with developmental disabilities, and encouragement of authors and illustrators to publish quality literature including characters with developmental disabilities. Eleven picture books and 27 youth and adolescent chapter books were found to be eligible for the award, and were analyzed. Preliminary results indicate a high proportion of characters with ASD compared to other developmental disabilities, almost twice as many males as females, and almost all characters who are Caucasian. Additional content analyses will be conducted and completed by January, 2018. Investigations will include: how the character with the developmental disability interacts with others, develops family relationships, and how exemplary practices are portrayed. Considering the eligible books for the 2018 award helps us come closer to conclusions regarding the trends of developmental disabilities throughout children’s literature. We will provide suggestions for using these books in K-16 classrooms.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
How do creative writers use research? I spent the summer of 2017 conducting personal research, a combination of imagination and hands-on exploration, on the Wasatch Mountain Range. I used works by Utah’s Terry Tempest Williams and Amy Irvine, who write about their love for and challenges with the region, as a backdrop for my own research. With funding from the Institute of Mountain Research, I chose to write about my own relationship with the Utah mountains. What do these mountains tell me about my life, family, history, and more importantly, how do they help me process trauma? My research included hiking along the Wasatch range, reading Williams and Irvine, taking pictures, and interviewing people. Sometimes I was alone, and other times I was accompanied by my fiancé, using the landscape to reflect on the death of his father. I turned a compilation of memories, reflections, and experiences into a long-form work of creative nonfiction, with multiple stories presented in vignettes. These are stories about people and nature, about trauma and healing, about loss and discovery. I hope to be given an opportunity to share these stories with an audience. You can view snippets of my writing here. The final product will be published on this website later this year: https://medium.com/the-mountain-commons/summer-2017-research-project-report-7a49e882f9e3
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Zac Van Pelt, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Zachary Webb, Dixie State University Beast is a marimba solo written by American composer and guitarist Steven Mackey. In recent years Mackey has been commissioned by groups such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic,the Kennedy Center, Sydney Symphony and New World Symphony. The central premise and intent behind creating a performance guide for Beast is that, as Mackey is an important American composer, understanding the processes and principles of his music is beneficial. Also, the value of studying marimba techniques employed in performance of the piece is important. The process and methodology of the research included a harmonic and rhythmic analysis of Beast in addition to preparing a performance. The process of identifying each element and comparing and contrasting it throughout the entire piece of music is paramount in research of the nature. Mackey uses compositional elements and utilizes performance techniques i a way that it introduces it well to the intermediate marimbist. With this knowledge, a musically mature and coherent performance is possible. Performance guides are effective and significant in the music field and this guide to Beast is no exception. As Mackey’s music continues to be performed by the leading symphonies and percussion students have a desire to learn, Beast will increase in stature in the canon. And as Beast was written with the intermediate marimbist in mind, the amount of in depth performance guides for that niche market are not readily available.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Miriam Sweeney, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Francesca DeMartino, Utah Valley University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Sara Schlagel, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jenica Heaton, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Dagan Pielstick, Brigham Young University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jennifer Spong, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Brooklyn Barton, Dixie State University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Ashlyn Judd, Southern Utah University
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Jennifer Marsh, Dixie State University
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Sam Katz, University of Utah Fine Arts “Tom Stockham: The Father of Digital Audio Recording” is a 30-minute documentary film about former University of Utah professor Thomas Greenway Stockham, Jr., who developed the first commercially viable method of recording sound digitally with extremely high fidelity and made it possible to edit sound and music using a hard drive. Despite the limitations of 60s and 70s computing technology, as well as a number of audio professionals who opposed to the shift to digital audio, Stockham believed in his ideas, persevered, and changed the way we listen to music forever. To this day, these innovations have dramatically altered the shape of the audio recording industry in music, television, and film. Despite Dr. Stockham’s many achievements, his story remains relatively unknown outside of the audio engineering world, even here at the University of Utah and in Salt Lake City, where much of his pioneering work was done. This film brings well-deserved attention to Dr. Stockham’s story. Sadly, Dr. Stockham passed away from early-onset Alzheimer’s in 2004, therefore I portray him by interviewing those who knew him best: his wife, his four children, and his colleagues. I situate Stockham’s life and work in a larger historical context by interviewing historians, musicians, and audio industry professionals, and by mining archival footage, family photos, voice memos, and magazines for relevant material. I travel from Seattle, to Boston, to Lake Powell, to Moab, to Salt Lake City. In homage to Stockham, I use the sound and music of the film, rather than images, as the locus from which meaning and emotional power are derived. The finished film serves as an important educational and historical resource and helps to preserve an important piece of the history of the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and the State of Utah in general.
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Kelly O’Neill, University of Utah Fine Arts After studying the formal qualities of photographic production and the canonic narratives of art history for over three years at the U, I am still left with a pressing question: how can this medium of artistic self-expression also be considered evidence admissible in the court of law powerful enough to elicit felony convictions? How can these mechanical images which I have been trained to see as subjective representations of artistic sentiment in their contrast, tonality, and composition simultaneously be objective records of fact in judicial and scientific discourses? If the medium of photography does exist how is this single operation able to function in such heterogeneous and contradictory discourses? Through my works and research I investigate these and other questions concerning the photographic medium’s ambiguous nature as a simultaneously aesthetic and empirical object. By combining a vast assortment of photographic forms from contemporary GIFs to historical processes such as the Cyanotype, my work reveals the multiplicity of the photographic form and its dubious ability to function within seemingly contradictory systems of knowledge production. Interrogating the processes by which photography has been used and abused, my project does not propose to reveal the truth of photography, but rather underlines the importance of seeing photography in a new and radicalized fashion. The images that I create contemplate the liminal spaces of photography in which its factual, emotional, institutional, and narrative truths commingle; fragmenting not only the solidity of the photograph but also the cultural and institutional systems it predominates. More than just a series of art works, my research seeks to bring a broader discourse on photographic meaning into a serious academic engagement which does not treat it as a simple device for conveying meaning but as a specific and complex subject in its own right.
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Steven Saline, Dixie State University Fine Arts Electronic Dance Music or EDM has grown from its underground club origins in the late 70’s to early 80’s to become a widespread phenomenon in pop music. Through out those years, EDM has been categorized in previous terms such as Techno, and Electronica. Today EDM can be heard in music festivals through out the world and is now widely experienced in the US. Much of the genres within EDM such as Dubstep, Hardcore,Trance, etc… were created and have evolved outside the US, however; House and Techno originates here in the US. In this presentation I will discuss the history of some of the popular genres in EDM, present how each of the genres started whether they were created on their own or their evolution from previous electronic music, the history of its origins, how the music evolved in Europe, and its move to the US as we hear the music today. I will present how wide-spread EDM has become and how diverse the various forms are within the genre. I propose that if EDM continues in the direction that it is moving now, EDM will continue to grow among all other forms of music in the world for years to come.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Hannah Braegger McKeachnie, Utah Valley University Fine Arts Purpose
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Jessica Russell, Dixie State University Fine Arts Early sources tell us women have traditionally played a background role in any event. It is only in recent decades that an interest in their historical role has taken place, and the field of musicology is no exception. Performers and composers that were well-known in their time have been forgotten as time moved forward. One such artist includes the Austrian composer and performer, Maria Theresia von Paradis. A contemporary of Mozart, Paradis was a traveling concert pianist and composer who is mostly remembered for being blind (Neuls-Bates 1982). Unfortunately, one of her most significant contributions to the field of music, namely her school of music for girls, has been forgotten and is left out of historical accounts almost completely. This school, which taught piano, voice, and music theory to girls, was innovative for its time (Fürst 2005). In this presentation, I will discuss the literature related to women in music in an effort to determine the extent to which these sources address Maria Theresia von Paradis and her contributions as a musician, composer, and pedagogue.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Rebekah Jackson, Brigham Young University Fine Arts This project has been an involved approach to studying the history of costume design, both through conventional research and the more tactile construction process. While Edith Head is a renowned costume designer with many books and articles on her life work, less has been done to understand how her designs functioned and evolved from concept to completion. But this process is essential to understanding her career’s success, as it opens valuable insights to how Head thought as a designer. It reveals what she was and wasn’t willing to compromise on, how she balanced aesthetics with practical considerations and how she worked with an actor or actress to achieve the proper look for their character. In Blake Edward’s production The Great Race, Edith Head’s designs showed this transformation of idea to reality by compromises between the original designs and finished garment. A simple red suit, worn in this production, exemplifies such compromise and was the construction portion of my research. Recreating this costume, in conjunction with conventional research on Head and her work, revealed important decisions Head made from materials to fit, how and why she changed her original design and the general approach she used in her work. These insights combine to form the basic pattern used in her creative process, applicable to both costume design and related fields as it unveils the thought process of one of Hollywood’s most successful career women.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Natalie Jarvis, Brigham Young University Fine Arts My fascination with the process of distortion and my desire to bond with the transformative nature of the ceramic medium drives my exploration of its abilities and limitations. Making myself a part of the natural movement of the clay and helping each piece to find its abstracted balance is important during the creation process.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Jennifer Sumsion, Utah Valley University Art I am influenced by natural elements, the combination of shapes, colors and textures are what interest me. The commonplace, banal and unnoticed aspects of nature draws my focus and inspires me capture images to my vision and transform them onto paper and canvas. The constant change in rocks, leaves, skies, trees and water continue to focus my attention and are reflected back into my images. The balance of lines, colors and tones adds patterns energy and new life when mixed together. Nature can look foreign when viewed close-up, intensifying the smallest detail. Unnatural influence on the environment has added a unique aspect to nature. It can create extraordinary patterns and encourage new images that are beautiful in themselves. I enjoy the way leaves fall on a sidewalk, the patterns of melted water and salt on the road after a snowstorm, the ice crystals that form on tree limbs when pollution levels are high and the light and shapes reflected in shoveled snow when it begins to melt. I use cool and warm colors together to create a bounce off of each other. I enjoy using oil paints, ink charcoal, acrylic, and nupastels in my work.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kelsey Spaulding, Weber State University Interior Design Research states that the youth in almost any setting, will always need attention and assistance in navigating life. Pre-teen and teen years can be a time when children need attention, guidance, and direction while developing into mature citizens of their community and world (Larson, Positive Development in a Disorderly World, 2011). Within schools, adolescents are taught only a few of the fundamental ideas and practices that would help them to better navigate in an ambiguous world. In a study done by the New York State Afterschool Network, learning opportunities outside of the classroom help to increase the application of lessons and give adolescents a higher probability for achievement (Network, 2012). Outside of school, adolescent youth need to be able to interact with each other and gain an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world. Without an interaction with other youth and different aspects of society, adolescents may become apathetic and lack an understanding of the effect they may have on others and their community (Balsano, 2005). In Ogden, Utah, there are a variety of cultures and backgrounds from which adolescent youth come (Bureau, 2012). It is important during the age of adolescence to interact in a personal, societal, and healthy environment during the time when their brains and personalities develop most (Larson, Adolescents’ Development of Skills for Agency in Youth Programs: Learning to Think Strategically, 2011). When given the proper tools, guidance, and opportunities to work with others and their community, adolescents become better leaders of the future. In turn they benefit society as a whole by creating a culture of understanding and willingness to work for an improved future (Network, 2012).In downtown Ogden a building has been proposed as a gathering place for youth between the ages of 14 and 18. The name of the building would be The Northern Utah Youth Center. The proposed design of the building has been created to accommodate a unique style of learning. It will provide a creative environment where youth are allowed to explore and experiment through the application of hands on learning. Utilizing the use of appropriate lighting, color and architectural design will allow for the youth to feel more at ease, creative, and constructive (Saxton, 2012). Within the two floors of the building, multipurpose rooms may be divided with partitions to maximize the use of space.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Rodolfo Rafael, Weber State University Performing Arts In preparation for choreographic projects for my degree, I attended the world-class Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company workshop on an undergraduate grant. The workshop included various subjects, but the most valuable and challenging approach was the emphasis on the “frame” of a work of art and how by changing the frame, the meaning and impact of art is affected. I became interested in the artistic and societal frame of marriage, and decided to use this frame for my student choreographic project. Since it was in an academic setting, I presented the idea in an open-ended manner, one that allowed the students to express their concerns. I was intent not so much on the outcome of the piece, but that the subject of marriage be questioned. I started by having a discussion with the students. I solicited and noted their boundaries. After finding an agreed upon point of compromise on how to approach this issue, we decided to move forward. Unfortunately, some never came back. In fear of losing more students, I changed directions. This experience brought me to a new issue. How much academic freedom do students have? Is higher education supposed to provide a platform where students are free to explore open inquiries? What if others aren’t willing to deal with social issues? Should students change the subject matter of their research to avoid offending others? How do we encourage others to discuss issues they don’t agree on? Is there a way we can find common ground and share the frame?
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kinsley Oates, Weber State University Interior Design Research shows that athletics help pave the wave for student to pay for college and obtain an education. (Proposition 48, N.C.A.A 2010) Proposition 48 supports this cause by focusing on the output of graduating students, rather than the input of entrance standards. The N.C.A.A studies show, “The persistence of low-achieving students in college have suggested that participation in athletics is frequently the catalyst for student who have not performed well in high school to study more diligently and, ultimately, to graduate.” Steve Kendall wrote that for many at-risk students, athletics is the only reason they go to school. He states, “These at-risk students who have no other reason to attend school other than athletics benefit from this policy. They are in classes and participating in the activities and exercises happening in the classrooms.” Jerry Tarkanian a coach at UNLV defends his stance on trying to help underprivileged players deserve a shot at straightening out their lives. The Maple Leaf Training Center located in Spanish Fork Utah, will provide at-risk student who attend high school a privilege to obtain scholarships and a chance of going to a college or university. Students who live in poverty and low income home do not have an option to get into colleges or universities. This 23,000 square foot facility will help 1st generations college students train and obtain scholarships, both academic and athletic for them to continue on to a college or university to pursue their future.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kristina Hess, Weber State University Interior Design Technology According to USA Today & Thompson Healthcare Center for Health Statistics and Bureau of Census Data, Utah is has the highest rate of depression in the nation. Research shows that girls become more likely to experience depression than boys in adolescents (NIMH)Prominence Residential Depression Treatment Center for adolescent girls will house the staff needed to perform program duties and will house the in-patient care residents. The facility requires an accredited high school, patient and staff housing, food preparation area, a cafeteria, a nursing station, therapy rooms, admin room, a homework room, and a free time room. Daylighting strategies will be needed for the treatment process. The program at Prominence will incorporate the research from Nedley (2011). The study concluded that part of depression is caused from not getting enough vitamin D that the sun produces. In addition, Prominence wants to promote safety and security for patients and as well as provide a family atmosphere. An appropriate color scheme to facilitate healing as well as accessibility will need to be taken into consideration and planned for accordingly.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Jessica Corey, Weber State University Interior Design Research has shown that senior citizens, due to the aging eye, need special accommodations in their daily activities and living (Moller, 2008). “The purpose of [the International Building] codes is to establish the minimum requirements to safeguard the public health, safety and general welfare through structural strength, means of egress facilities, stability, sanitation, adequate light and ventilation, energy conservation, and safety to life and property from fire and other hazards attributed to the built environment and to provide safety to fire fighters and emergency responders during emergency operations” (IBC 101.3 Intent). The independent senior living facility, Riley Court is being renovated to cater to the elderly. In addition to implementing universal design concepts, research on the aging eye, community-dwelling for elders, and functional limitations will enhance their ability to be independent. Moller’s research showed that visual impairment is one of the top four reasons for a loss of independence among seniors. The study suggested that lighting, color, and accessories have a high priority of focus when designing for older individuals. Riley Court, a 15,000 square foot independent senior living facility, located in Bountiful, Utah will feature a fully accessible facility and finishes that reflect the research from Moller’s study. In addition, adequate lighting will be provided as well as a home-like atmosphere for residents.