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Fine Arts

January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
I plan to research the possibility of using the modern podcast as a medium to publish the familiar essay. Once thought of as a thing of the past, the modern essay permeates American culture more than almost any other format of writing. It can be seen in blog posts, newspaper columns, memoirs, and even social media posts. Although it is not normally advertised in these contexts as an essay, it carries the same exploratory characteristics that shaped social innovations and revolutions throughout the history of the United States. It was used to draw attention to social injustices by activists like James Baldwin and W.E.B. Du Bois. It was used to draw votes by political hopefuls like Theodore Roosevelt. It was even used to define and prescribe aspects of culture— including fashion, literature, media, and food— by magazines such as The New Yorker. Essays have long been influential to the middle class American. Podcasts have been taking advantage of elements of the essay without knowing it for the past several years. Popular shows such as Hidden Brain, This American Life, Invisibilia, and Revisionist History produce episodes that either are essays or contain various essayic elements that provide the same kind of charming, persuasive clout of the essay of previous centuries. In this project, I delve into this as-of-yet unexplored connection between a classic genre and a new, popular medium of delivery. I will test my hypothesis that the principles of an engaging, popular essay are also the principles that make an engaging, popular nonfiction podcast. I will do so by conducting research for, writing, and producing a podcast using essayic traits.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Can different literary theories be applied to the movie Bladerunner? The purpose of the research is to find common themes of literary theory and see if the themes of Bladerunner fit within these literary theories of post-structuralism and post-colonialism. I will be looking at two different Marxist theorists, Benjamin and his essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” and Jameson and his essay “Postmodernism and Consumer Society”. I will also be looking at Said’s essay “Orientalism” in regards to asserting that Bladerunner is also a post-colonial work. Within Benjamin’s essay I would be looking at the idea that humans are works of art and that androids are mechanical reproductions of said art and the implications of this in regards to originality. I will be looking at Jameson’s essay and the idea of consumerist society and how it ties in with Bladerunner as well as the novel that inspired Bladerunner, Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? The significance of this is seeing if this popular eighties cult classic is what it might reveal by looking at it with different literary theories. The concluding research will help illuminate how these theories can add a different viewing and reading in regards to Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Bladerunner.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Zachary Webb, Dixie State University Beast is a marimba solo written by American composer and guitarist Steven Mackey. In recent years Mackey has been commissioned by groups such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic,the Kennedy Center, Sydney Symphony and New World Symphony. The central premise and intent behind creating a performance guide for Beast is that, as Mackey is an important American composer, understanding the processes and principles of his music is beneficial. Also, the value of studying marimba techniques employed in performance of the piece is important. The process and methodology of the research included a harmonic and rhythmic analysis of Beast in addition to preparing a performance. The process of identifying each element and comparing and contrasting it throughout the entire piece of music is paramount in research of the nature. Mackey uses compositional elements and utilizes performance techniques i a way that it introduces it well to the intermediate marimbist. With this knowledge, a musically mature and coherent performance is possible. Performance guides are effective and significant in the music field and this guide to Beast is no exception. As Mackey’s music continues to be performed by the leading symphonies and percussion students have a desire to learn, Beast will increase in stature in the canon. And as Beast was written with the intermediate marimbist in mind, the amount of in depth performance guides for that niche market are not readily available.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Abstract Title: Artistic Behaviors and Aggressive Tendencies in Childhood Author: Ashlyn Judd Mentor: Michelle Grimes, Ph.D. Background: Art has been credited with assisting children in strengthening their sense of identity, self-esteem, self-expression, as well as aiding in trauma processing (Hashemian, 2015; Kramer, 1972; Parisian, 2015). Though the theoretical foundation for art therapy as an intervention for aggression has been discussed, little research is available to evaluate this claim. The available data consists primarily of case study methodology. To add to existing knowledge, we employed a correlational study to investigate if there is a relationship between visual arts engagement and aggressive tendencies in children. We hypothesized there would be a negative relationship between artistic involvement and aggressive behavior. Methods: 148 participants completed the study. Inclusion criteria included being the parent of a child between the ages of 4-12. The average age of the participating parent was 35.4 (SD=7.09). The average age of child was 7.5 (SD=2.99). Participants were recruited from the SUU SONA system and Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Participants completed a 16 item child aggression questionnaire, as well as a 10 art involvement questionnaire. Both questionnaires were developed specifically for this project. Participants recruited via SONA were compensated by receiving course credit. Participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk were compensated with $0.10. Results: We ran a Pearson’s correlation to explore the relationship between the Art Survey total score (M=28.22, SD=5.74) and the Aggression survey total score (M=26.83, SD=8.59). The results showed a non-significant relationship between these variables r = .080, p = .369. Conclusion: The negative correlation that we predicted was not found. There are a few possibilities to explain this finding. The first is that art and aggression do not have the inverse relationship predicted by the theory. Another possibility may be that the self-report methodology did not accurately measure art, aggression, or both constructs. Further experimental study is needed to address the effectiveness of art therapy with children. Implications and future directions of the research will be discussed further.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
“Diary from Enisle Prison” is a short fiction narrative depicting privilege finally confronted with reality. In it, a reporter is temporarily imprisoned with society’s outcasts and records a few of the inmates’ tales. Internal dialogue carries this piece: by forsaking the traditional third person narration, the reader is allowed to follow the internal journey of the reporter from a view of social justice as a privileged man’s sport, to a realization of critical and urgent plight of those individuals arbitrarily deemed deviant. Modelling concepts established by the likes of Henry David Thoreau and George Orwell, this story takes political narrative to a fictional, dystopian setting to enable literary commentary on current issues. This story expresses my views on the importance of informing those voices who create policy, and was itself informed by the scholarship I have pursued as an aspiring author.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
In this non-fiction essay, I chronicle a rite of passage I went through in high school following the death of a close friend. A teacher encouraged me to write about my grief and pass it on to my friend's mother, a teacher at my high school in rural Utah. The essay, composed for an advanced writing course, bears the influence of Adichie, Sherman Alexie, and Virginia Woolf, utilizing elements drawn from fiction technique I have studied in other writing classes, e.g. symbol, dialogue, characterization.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Kimberly Tarnasky, Kelli Egan, Brigham Young University The Dolly Gray Children’s Literature Award recognizes authors, illustrators, and publishers of high quality fictional and biographical children, intermediate, and young adult books that authentically portray individuals with developmental disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), intellectual disabilities, and Down syndrome. The Dolly Gray Children’s Literature Award was created to make an impact toward the general public’s recognition of the positive societal contributions of individuals with developmental disabilities, greater understanding and acceptance of teachers and school-aged peers of students with developmental disabilities, and encouragement of authors and illustrators to publish quality literature including characters with developmental disabilities. Eleven picture books and 27 youth and adolescent chapter books were found to be eligible for the award, and were analyzed. Preliminary results indicate a high proportion of characters with ASD compared to other developmental disabilities, almost twice as many males as females, and almost all characters who are Caucasian. Additional content analyses will be conducted and completed by January, 2018. Investigations will include: how the character with the developmental disability interacts with others, develops family relationships, and how exemplary practices are portrayed. Considering the eligible books for the 2018 award helps us come closer to conclusions regarding the trends of developmental disabilities throughout children’s literature. We will provide suggestions for using these books in K-16 classrooms.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Postmortem photography is a phenomenon which both horrifies and fascinates. What seems a strange obsession with death, and troubling fixation on corpses, is more accurately understood as an obsession with memory – and the lengths people will go to in order to capture what they can of their lost loved ones. The most interesting information studying postmortem photography provides is not the facts of Victorian mourning and burial practices, but something less explored: how the Victorians formed attachments to their friends and family while alive. It is true that these photographs were taken due to the relative newness of photography at the time and families often possessed no image of the deceased while they were alive. Because of this, and high child mortality rates, the majority of post-mortem photographs feature infants and children. What then should catch our attention is the rarer images of teenagers and young adults. The photograph is often personalized to fit the character or interests of the individual, the name, age, and even cause of death of the person is often known, and the photographs were generally reproduced multiple times to be distributed to non-immediate family and friends. This reveals, quite simply, the level of investment that the mourners had in their deceased family and friends. Infant/child death was so prevalent that Victorians took steps to ensure they did not form strong attachments until the child had grown and come of age. The deaths of teenagers were, then, more devastating, as they had impacted the lives of many individuals, and their family and friends could usually expect to enjoy a long and happy life with them (the Victorian lifespan being relatively close to ours today, if infancy was survived). This paper observes the variety of post-mortem photographs available to us today, and uses them to illustrate what we can learn both about Victorian mourning practices and the way familial relationships were invested in before the death of their subjects. This is a unique approach to studying these photographs, as previously they have typically been used to draw conclusions about standard burial practices – when in fact they have so much to teach us about how the living Victorians protected themselves in a world of prevalent death.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
According to results from the 2014 National Survey and Health from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association, 21.5 million people over the age of twelve had a Substance Use Disorder. This includes 17.0 million people with an alcohol addiction, 7.1 million with an illicit drug addiction, 4.2 million with a marijuana addiction, and 1.9 million with a non-medical prescription pain reliever addiction. These numbers represent 8.1% of the American Population. As an intellectual choreographer, I questioned if the physical and psychological problems that an addict experiences could be translated into the formative properties of dance. In this research project, several criteria that contribute to the Substance Use Disorder are explored through dance by working with the properties of time, space, and focus. The symptoms that are explored are withdrawal reactions, cravings, inability to cut down or control the substance use, and continued usage despite having persistent physical or psychological problems that are correlated with substance use. In this piece, I played with levels to create the up and downs that happen physically and emotionally to the users. I also experimented with circle and spiral patterns to show that it is a repeated problem that also bringing the person down. I also utilized two groups of dancers to further my intent. In one group were the dancers who were experiencing the symptoms of the addiction. These dancers are known as the users. The second group of dancers were the physical manifestation of the drugs control over the individuals, i.e. the addiction. In contrast, the individuals who represent the addiction have linear and direct movement pattern. In order to create a sense of uncertainty, the dancers also work with irregular accents while playing with very slow to very fast timing. It is my intention for the outcome of this piece to illuminate the struggles of an individual who is dealing with the Substance Use Disorder through dance by playing with properties of time, space, and focus.
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
How do creative writers use research? I spent the summer of 2017 conducting personal research, a combination of imagination and hands-on exploration, on the Wasatch Mountain Range. I used works by Utah’s Terry Tempest Williams and Amy Irvine, who write about their love for and challenges with the region, as a backdrop for my own research. With funding from the Institute of Mountain Research, I chose to write about my own relationship with the Utah mountains. What do these mountains tell me about my life, family, history, and more importantly, how do they help me process trauma? My research included hiking along the Wasatch range, reading Williams and Irvine, taking pictures, and interviewing people. Sometimes I was alone, and other times I was accompanied by my fiancé, using the landscape to reflect on the death of his father. I turned a compilation of memories, reflections, and experiences into a long-form work of creative nonfiction, with multiple stories presented in vignettes. These are stories about people and nature, about trauma and healing, about loss and discovery. I hope to be given an opportunity to share these stories with an audience. You can view snippets of my writing here. The final product will be published on this website later this year: https://medium.com/the-mountain-commons/summer-2017-research-project-report-7a49e882f9e3
January 01, 2018 12:00 AM
Music has been shown to be a catalyst for emotion and that many people use music to help regulate their emotions when in aversive situations (Thoma et al., 2012). Many other studies have been done within the realm of music and emotion, but little research has been done to show whether the music itself, the lyrics, or a combination of both are the cause of emotional change. Around two-hundred participants volunteered to be exposed to one of six random conditions: an original score of music, the original score without lyrics, an altered version of the original score, the altered version without lyrics, the lyrics without music, and finally a control condition where they were not presented with any musical elements. After the presentation of the stimuli, participants were given a survey which assessed their emotion as well as the participant’s emotional-awareness skill-set. Data collection will be completed November 2017 and results/implications will be analyzed December/January 2017.
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Sam Katz, University of Utah Fine Arts “Tom Stockham: The Father of Digital Audio Recording” is a 30-minute documentary film about former University of Utah professor Thomas Greenway Stockham, Jr., who developed the first commercially viable method of recording sound digitally with extremely high fidelity and made it possible to edit sound and music using a hard drive. Despite the limitations of 60s and 70s computing technology, as well as a number of audio professionals who opposed to the shift to digital audio, Stockham believed in his ideas, persevered, and changed the way we listen to music forever. To this day, these innovations have dramatically altered the shape of the audio recording industry in music, television, and film. Despite Dr. Stockham’s many achievements, his story remains relatively unknown outside of the audio engineering world, even here at the University of Utah and in Salt Lake City, where much of his pioneering work was done. This film brings well-deserved attention to Dr. Stockham’s story. Sadly, Dr. Stockham passed away from early-onset Alzheimer’s in 2004, therefore I portray him by interviewing those who knew him best: his wife, his four children, and his colleagues. I situate Stockham’s life and work in a larger historical context by interviewing historians, musicians, and audio industry professionals, and by mining archival footage, family photos, voice memos, and magazines for relevant material. I travel from Seattle, to Boston, to Lake Powell, to Moab, to Salt Lake City. In homage to Stockham, I use the sound and music of the film, rather than images, as the locus from which meaning and emotional power are derived. The finished film serves as an important educational and historical resource and helps to preserve an important piece of the history of the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and the State of Utah in general.
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Kelly O’Neill, University of Utah Fine Arts After studying the formal qualities of photographic production and the canonic narratives of art history for over three years at the U, I am still left with a pressing question: how can this medium of artistic self-expression also be considered evidence admissible in the court of law powerful enough to elicit felony convictions? How can these mechanical images which I have been trained to see as subjective representations of artistic sentiment in their contrast, tonality, and composition simultaneously be objective records of fact in judicial and scientific discourses? If the medium of photography does exist how is this single operation able to function in such heterogeneous and contradictory discourses? Through my works and research I investigate these and other questions concerning the photographic medium’s ambiguous nature as a simultaneously aesthetic and empirical object. By combining a vast assortment of photographic forms from contemporary GIFs to historical processes such as the Cyanotype, my work reveals the multiplicity of the photographic form and its dubious ability to function within seemingly contradictory systems of knowledge production. Interrogating the processes by which photography has been used and abused, my project does not propose to reveal the truth of photography, but rather underlines the importance of seeing photography in a new and radicalized fashion. The images that I create contemplate the liminal spaces of photography in which its factual, emotional, institutional, and narrative truths commingle; fragmenting not only the solidity of the photograph but also the cultural and institutional systems it predominates. More than just a series of art works, my research seeks to bring a broader discourse on photographic meaning into a serious academic engagement which does not treat it as a simple device for conveying meaning but as a specific and complex subject in its own right.
January 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Steven Saline, Dixie State University Fine Arts Electronic Dance Music or EDM has grown from its underground club origins in the late 70’s to early 80’s to become a widespread phenomenon in pop music. Through out those years, EDM has been categorized in previous terms such as Techno, and Electronica. Today EDM can be heard in music festivals through out the world and is now widely experienced in the US. Much of the genres within EDM such as Dubstep, Hardcore,Trance, etc… were created and have evolved outside the US, however; House and Techno originates here in the US. In this presentation I will discuss the history of some of the popular genres in EDM, present how each of the genres started whether they were created on their own or their evolution from previous electronic music, the history of its origins, how the music evolved in Europe, and its move to the US as we hear the music today. I will present how wide-spread EDM has become and how diverse the various forms are within the genre. I propose that if EDM continues in the direction that it is moving now, EDM will continue to grow among all other forms of music in the world for years to come.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Hannah Braegger McKeachnie, Utah Valley University Fine Arts Purpose
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Jessica Russell, Dixie State University Fine Arts Early sources tell us women have traditionally played a background role in any event. It is only in recent decades that an interest in their historical role has taken place, and the field of musicology is no exception. Performers and composers that were well-known in their time have been forgotten as time moved forward. One such artist includes the Austrian composer and performer, Maria Theresia von Paradis. A contemporary of Mozart, Paradis was a traveling concert pianist and composer who is mostly remembered for being blind (Neuls-Bates 1982). Unfortunately, one of her most significant contributions to the field of music, namely her school of music for girls, has been forgotten and is left out of historical accounts almost completely. This school, which taught piano, voice, and music theory to girls, was innovative for its time (Fürst 2005). In this presentation, I will discuss the literature related to women in music in an effort to determine the extent to which these sources address Maria Theresia von Paradis and her contributions as a musician, composer, and pedagogue.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Rebekah Jackson, Brigham Young University Fine Arts This project has been an involved approach to studying the history of costume design, both through conventional research and the more tactile construction process. While Edith Head is a renowned costume designer with many books and articles on her life work, less has been done to understand how her designs functioned and evolved from concept to completion. But this process is essential to understanding her career’s success, as it opens valuable insights to how Head thought as a designer. It reveals what she was and wasn’t willing to compromise on, how she balanced aesthetics with practical considerations and how she worked with an actor or actress to achieve the proper look for their character. In Blake Edward’s production The Great Race, Edith Head’s designs showed this transformation of idea to reality by compromises between the original designs and finished garment. A simple red suit, worn in this production, exemplifies such compromise and was the construction portion of my research. Recreating this costume, in conjunction with conventional research on Head and her work, revealed important decisions Head made from materials to fit, how and why she changed her original design and the general approach she used in her work. These insights combine to form the basic pattern used in her creative process, applicable to both costume design and related fields as it unveils the thought process of one of Hollywood’s most successful career women.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Natalie Jarvis, Brigham Young University Fine Arts My fascination with the process of distortion and my desire to bond with the transformative nature of the ceramic medium drives my exploration of its abilities and limitations. Making myself a part of the natural movement of the clay and helping each piece to find its abstracted balance is important during the creation process.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Jennifer Sumsion, Utah Valley University Art I am influenced by natural elements, the combination of shapes, colors and textures are what interest me. The commonplace, banal and unnoticed aspects of nature draws my focus and inspires me capture images to my vision and transform them onto paper and canvas. The constant change in rocks, leaves, skies, trees and water continue to focus my attention and are reflected back into my images. The balance of lines, colors and tones adds patterns energy and new life when mixed together. Nature can look foreign when viewed close-up, intensifying the smallest detail. Unnatural influence on the environment has added a unique aspect to nature. It can create extraordinary patterns and encourage new images that are beautiful in themselves. I enjoy the way leaves fall on a sidewalk, the patterns of melted water and salt on the road after a snowstorm, the ice crystals that form on tree limbs when pollution levels are high and the light and shapes reflected in shoveled snow when it begins to melt. I use cool and warm colors together to create a bounce off of each other. I enjoy using oil paints, ink charcoal, acrylic, and nupastels in my work.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kelsey Spaulding, Weber State University Interior Design Research states that the youth in almost any setting, will always need attention and assistance in navigating life. Pre-teen and teen years can be a time when children need attention, guidance, and direction while developing into mature citizens of their community and world (Larson, Positive Development in a Disorderly World, 2011). Within schools, adolescents are taught only a few of the fundamental ideas and practices that would help them to better navigate in an ambiguous world. In a study done by the New York State Afterschool Network, learning opportunities outside of the classroom help to increase the application of lessons and give adolescents a higher probability for achievement (Network, 2012). Outside of school, adolescent youth need to be able to interact with each other and gain an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world. Without an interaction with other youth and different aspects of society, adolescents may become apathetic and lack an understanding of the effect they may have on others and their community (Balsano, 2005). In Ogden, Utah, there are a variety of cultures and backgrounds from which adolescent youth come (Bureau, 2012). It is important during the age of adolescence to interact in a personal, societal, and healthy environment during the time when their brains and personalities develop most (Larson, Adolescents’ Development of Skills for Agency in Youth Programs: Learning to Think Strategically, 2011). When given the proper tools, guidance, and opportunities to work with others and their community, adolescents become better leaders of the future. In turn they benefit society as a whole by creating a culture of understanding and willingness to work for an improved future (Network, 2012).In downtown Ogden a building has been proposed as a gathering place for youth between the ages of 14 and 18. The name of the building would be The Northern Utah Youth Center. The proposed design of the building has been created to accommodate a unique style of learning. It will provide a creative environment where youth are allowed to explore and experiment through the application of hands on learning. Utilizing the use of appropriate lighting, color and architectural design will allow for the youth to feel more at ease, creative, and constructive (Saxton, 2012). Within the two floors of the building, multipurpose rooms may be divided with partitions to maximize the use of space.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Rodolfo Rafael, Weber State University Performing Arts In preparation for choreographic projects for my degree, I attended the world-class Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company workshop on an undergraduate grant. The workshop included various subjects, but the most valuable and challenging approach was the emphasis on the “frame” of a work of art and how by changing the frame, the meaning and impact of art is affected. I became interested in the artistic and societal frame of marriage, and decided to use this frame for my student choreographic project. Since it was in an academic setting, I presented the idea in an open-ended manner, one that allowed the students to express their concerns. I was intent not so much on the outcome of the piece, but that the subject of marriage be questioned. I started by having a discussion with the students. I solicited and noted their boundaries. After finding an agreed upon point of compromise on how to approach this issue, we decided to move forward. Unfortunately, some never came back. In fear of losing more students, I changed directions. This experience brought me to a new issue. How much academic freedom do students have? Is higher education supposed to provide a platform where students are free to explore open inquiries? What if others aren’t willing to deal with social issues? Should students change the subject matter of their research to avoid offending others? How do we encourage others to discuss issues they don’t agree on? Is there a way we can find common ground and share the frame?
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kinsley Oates, Weber State University Interior Design Research shows that athletics help pave the wave for student to pay for college and obtain an education. (Proposition 48, N.C.A.A 2010) Proposition 48 supports this cause by focusing on the output of graduating students, rather than the input of entrance standards. The N.C.A.A studies show, “The persistence of low-achieving students in college have suggested that participation in athletics is frequently the catalyst for student who have not performed well in high school to study more diligently and, ultimately, to graduate.” Steve Kendall wrote that for many at-risk students, athletics is the only reason they go to school. He states, “These at-risk students who have no other reason to attend school other than athletics benefit from this policy. They are in classes and participating in the activities and exercises happening in the classrooms.” Jerry Tarkanian a coach at UNLV defends his stance on trying to help underprivileged players deserve a shot at straightening out their lives. The Maple Leaf Training Center located in Spanish Fork Utah, will provide at-risk student who attend high school a privilege to obtain scholarships and a chance of going to a college or university. Students who live in poverty and low income home do not have an option to get into colleges or universities. This 23,000 square foot facility will help 1st generations college students train and obtain scholarships, both academic and athletic for them to continue on to a college or university to pursue their future.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kristina Hess, Weber State University Interior Design Technology According to USA Today & Thompson Healthcare Center for Health Statistics and Bureau of Census Data, Utah is has the highest rate of depression in the nation. Research shows that girls become more likely to experience depression than boys in adolescents (NIMH)Prominence Residential Depression Treatment Center for adolescent girls will house the staff needed to perform program duties and will house the in-patient care residents. The facility requires an accredited high school, patient and staff housing, food preparation area, a cafeteria, a nursing station, therapy rooms, admin room, a homework room, and a free time room. Daylighting strategies will be needed for the treatment process. The program at Prominence will incorporate the research from Nedley (2011). The study concluded that part of depression is caused from not getting enough vitamin D that the sun produces. In addition, Prominence wants to promote safety and security for patients and as well as provide a family atmosphere. An appropriate color scheme to facilitate healing as well as accessibility will need to be taken into consideration and planned for accordingly.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Jessica Corey, Weber State University Interior Design Research has shown that senior citizens, due to the aging eye, need special accommodations in their daily activities and living (Moller, 2008). “The purpose of [the International Building] codes is to establish the minimum requirements to safeguard the public health, safety and general welfare through structural strength, means of egress facilities, stability, sanitation, adequate light and ventilation, energy conservation, and safety to life and property from fire and other hazards attributed to the built environment and to provide safety to fire fighters and emergency responders during emergency operations” (IBC 101.3 Intent). The independent senior living facility, Riley Court is being renovated to cater to the elderly. In addition to implementing universal design concepts, research on the aging eye, community-dwelling for elders, and functional limitations will enhance their ability to be independent. Moller’s research showed that visual impairment is one of the top four reasons for a loss of independence among seniors. The study suggested that lighting, color, and accessories have a high priority of focus when designing for older individuals. Riley Court, a 15,000 square foot independent senior living facility, located in Bountiful, Utah will feature a fully accessible facility and finishes that reflect the research from Moller’s study. In addition, adequate lighting will be provided as well as a home-like atmosphere for residents.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Krista Brown, Weber State University Interior Design Research has shown that through January 2007, the wounded-to-fatality counts of Operation Iraqi Freedom is higher (about 7.6) than during earlier U.S. military conflicts, such as the ratio of 5.2 for Vietnam (Goldberg, 2010). This means that more soldiers are dying more from hostile combat rather than sickness or non-battle injuries. The Salt Lake area is not currently set up to accommodate the needs of these returning military personnel who have been inflicted with a war injury. Rooms are not adequate and not all necessary areas such as burn rehabilitation are addressed. The government has allowed for a veteran support home to be put into an existing building in Salt Lake City, UT. The objective of the veteran’s support home, “Hope Against Hope,” is to create a facility approximately 15,000 square feet that creates an area for veterans to heal and adapt to their new life style. Currently there is a lack of facilities in Utah that can fulfill all of the needs the “Hope Against Hope Veteran Support Home,” plans to accommodate. This support home will be located in Salt Lake City near the University of Utah hospital. This area was chosen because of the close proximity to the airport, the local medical support and emergency services, as well as the beauty of the surrounding area. Among the needs for the “Hope Against Hope,” center include future expansion, comfort, and should reflect universal design principles. In addition day lighting principles will be a focus. Research has shown that people in institutional areas don’t receive adequate exposure to natural light needed to synchronize sleeping patterns (Brawley, 2009). An advantage of the current location of the center is the close proximity to the Wasatch Mountain Range which provides spectacular views. This advantage will be used to promote healing as well as giving patients a sense of night and day in a home like setting. Color, common rooms, and a flowing floor plan will also provide a new life and hope for injured veterans as they recover from injuries sustained in military service.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Brittany Brown, Weber State University Interior Design According to the article Contributions of Built Environment 68% of the adult population is considered obese. (Rahman, 2011) The article also states that childhood obesity is on a steady rise. The research provides evidence that obesity shortens Americans life expectancy by 2 to 5 years on average. The study by Rahman recommends that adults engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity weekly and at least 60 minutes every day. The Spencer Weight Loss Retreat is a 18,000 square foot facility located in Meridian, Mississippi. The weight loss retreat will provide weight loss training and medical attention for those residents of Meridian who are considered obese and want treatment to gain back their lives. The weight loss center will provide each patient with a personal trainer who will guide in their weight loss. The facility will provide the patients access to their gym where they can use treadmills, bikes, weights, outdoor routines, and other activities to meet the 150 minute workouts a week. The Spencer Weight Loss Retreat will provide a classroom to educate the patients in nutrition and other life skills.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Sarah Breinholt, Weber State University Interior Design Spiriti Forti Rebuild and Recovery Center is a facility that heals the psychological and body issues for individuals with eating disorders. Research has shown that long-term stay care facilities should contain a “home-like” atmosphere that reflects the site’s surroundings. In a study by Schneider (2008) explains the importance for the patient to feel comfortable and relaxed in order to achieve maximum recovery. In addition, a study by Kaya (2009) explores the effect that color has on individual’s emotions and health. A study that was completed on a group of individuals of all ages and all nationalities shows that overall; people have very similar reactions to the same colors in spite of age or race. The colors blue and green have been recognized to reduce anxiety and promote calmness and well-being. Because of this reason, this color palette will be implemented in the design of this recovery center. A former historic train station in St. George, Utah has been acquired by Spiriti Forti Rebuild and Recovery Center to be renovated to accommodate a getaway for patients to escape the world and rebuild their body image and self-esteem. Among the features of the care center will cafeteria/kitchen that focuses on education and nutrition, rooms for long-term stay, as well as spaces for multiple activities for individual and group building exercises. This facility should become a place that provides all the necessary components for patients to make a full recovery of their psychological and image disorders.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Kyra Marie Bell, Weber State University Interior Design The negative impacts that tourists can have on the environment is a major reason that so many pristine natural habitats are off limits to travelers. With so many tourists around the world, the effects of carbon emissions from transportation, excessive waste, and harm to delicate ecosystems, these restricted areas seem to be growing (Center for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development (CESD), 2009) As a result, ecotourism has started to gain popularity, as it focuses on minimizing ecological and socio-cultural impacts (TIES, 2012). With the emergence of LEED certification, builders and designers are now provided with a way to implement green building design throughout the entire building process (USGBC, 2011). This makes it possible to not only construct a hotel built in sustainable ways, but to continually have a lower impact on the environment and educate people on ways they can lessen their own footprint. However, less than 100 hotels world-wide have achieved LEED certification, and as of 2010 there is only one such hotel in Utah (HKS, 2011). In Southern Utah, where many of the states national parks are located, lodging that meets the needs of ecotourism by limiting its impact on the environment is nearly non-existent. In order to visit the beautiful, undisturbed environments available in these regions, tourists need a place where they can stay that they know focuses on sustainability and limited impact on the environment as much as the tourists do. Having an ecotourism hotel in Southern Utah would encourage “tourism that seeks to minimize ecological and socio-cultural impacts while providing economic benefits to local communities” (TIES, 2012).In order to meet these needs, The Hotel Viridi will be built as a 15,000 square foot eco-tourism hotel in Southern Utah that meets all the LEED certification requirements as well as the 12 Aims of Sustainable Tourism (Center for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development (CESD), 2009). These needs will be met through the use of an adaptive re-use building, in which the hotel will incorporate four different aspects of design; hospitality design as found in all public areas of the hotel, a residential area for hotel guests to stay, healthcare design in the form of an onsite gym, and commercial design where the offices and lecture hall are located.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Machaela Burt, Utah State University Theatre Arts This research study explores the efficacy of the “Living Literature Project”, a program that teaches traditional English curriculum in high school classrooms using theatre-based strategies to enhance understanding of Shakespearean texts. The study was piloted with two control classes and two intervention classes in 2012 with strategies such as viewing performances by experienced actors during class and paraphrasing texts into modern speech to assess the impact on learning through the use of teacher-administered pre and post project surveys assessing student attitudes towards Shakespeare as well as content quizzes. The results of the pilot study suggested that students who participated in the project achieved higher quiz scores, but their attitudes about Shakespeare were not changed. The pilot study informed further developments of the teaching strategies and led to further curriculum development. The project is currently in session for the 12-13 school year. The study is being expanded to include a larger number of classes that will also assess teacher satisfaction with the academic progress made by the students involved. The results will be assessed through revised surveys and quizzes as well as focus groups with the students. Results are anticipated in April 2013. The pilot study suggested that arts integration and the building of cross-curricular relationships have a positive effect on student learning. The current study hopes to reinforce these results with more accurate assessments and to see increased topical interest, measured through focus groups.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Thomas Skousen, Dixie State University Art Concordia apostolorum, the union of apostles, is found in literature, art, and even the topography of Rome. Rome is unique in the fact that it unites Peter and Paul. Early Christians revered these saints and dedicated two of the most important churches in the city to them. Their deaths in Rome were a crucial factor in identifying Rome as the principal capital of Christendom. As Christianity spread and was accepted throughout the empire, different Christian centers arose, aside from Jerusalem and Rome. In order to maintain its place at the top tier of the Christian hierarchy, the Roman Popes used the idea of concordia apostolorum to not only speak to Roman citizens, but also to pilgrims who visited the city. The use of concordia apostolorum extended into the ninth century with Pope Paschal I’s (817-824) mosaics at Santa Prassede. These have historically been categorized into the Carolingian Renaissance. However, Paschal and earlier popes were trying to create a uniquely Roman Renaissance, and Peter and Paul’s place in art is crucial to their propaganda. The apse mosaic in Santa Prassede employs concordia apostolorum to promote the primacy of Rome. Louis the Pious inherited the empire from his father Charlemagne and surrounded himself with bishops and scholars who questioned the authority of the pope, thus igniting a struggle between the pope and the Carolingians. This paper will show that Paschal I commissioned art that emphasized his role in carrying out the ministerial work of Peter and Paul. In art and in life, Paschal sought to become not only the principal figure in Christianity, a living apostle, but also a chief player in Europe’s political structure.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Brook Owen, Dixie State University Theatre My theory is that theatre can portray emotion and convey a story without verbal communication. As an actor, I struggled to portray emotion while using a memorized script. As I worked through my theatrical training, I was introduced to exercises that took away language. I found artistic freedom in these exercises and formulated a research project to understand what would happen if actors were given freedom from language completely. This research is founded in the works of artists such as mime John Weaver and absurdist Samuel Beckett. One of the most prominent movement artists of our time is Anne Bogart. Her movement technique, called Viewpoints, focuses on the physical aspects of portraying emotion and kinesthetic response. This is where my physical research started. In rehearsal, actors experiment with Bogart’s viewpoints, while responding to different styles of music. Then I begin to move away from Bogart’s research. While allowing them to maintain their own organic choices, I give my actors more specific acting objectives with which to work. For example, “Imagine that your character wants to purpose.” Once completed, the actors talk to me about how the exercise expanded their physical toolbox. One comment from an actor symbolizes the heart of this research. “When the music starts, you think of an emotion, and then you start responding to that emotion. That’s when the character starts to form. And the next thing you know, you have a little story around it.” Repetition of this process will culminate in a narrative movement piece.
January 01, 2013 12:00 AM
Hilary Wolfley, Brigham Young University Dance The purpose of this project is to enhance the caliber and reputation of ballet in higher education-specifically contemporary ballet at BYU-while strengthening my own choreographic abilities under the guidance and coaching of my mentor, Shani Robison, Associate Professor. I have choreographed an original contemporary ballet entitled “Transition” that explores the ways in which we react to the challenges of change in our lives. Through exploring this theme, creating innovative movement, and rehearsing with talented dancers, I am working closely with my mentor to fulfill UCUR’s mission to creatively contribute to the discipline of contemporary ballet. I recently completed this project as the culmination of my undergraduate work at BYU as a dance major. This is the link to my project as performed last week at the BYU Ballet Showcase: http://youtu.be/j1t0MPcLUyw (DVD available upon request). The BYU Ballet Program has selected me as the only ballet student from BYU this year to represent undergraduate student creative work by presenting my project at the American College Dance Festival Northwest Region at Southern Utah University March 11-15, 2013 (ACDF). During this festival, my piece will be viewed by collegiate dance students and educators from across the country and adjudicated by internationally renowned experts in the dance field.