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Utah's Foremost Platform for Undergraduate Research Presentation

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January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Daniel Gulbrandsen, Utah Valley University Mathematical Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Stephen Tahan, Westminster College Life Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Naomi Buys, Dixie State University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Gry Wheaton, AnnaBelle Bryan, James Stephenson, and Chad Morrow, University of Utah Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Shawn King, Dixie State University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Alexis Holman, Utah Valley University Health
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Benjamin Hardy, Brigham Young University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Jens Swensen, Southern Utah University Physical Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Lia Bogoev, Utah State University Physical Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Grant Molnar, Brigham Young University Mathematical Sciences One important attribute of a network of points, or graph, is its independence number: the maximum size of a set of points (vertices) in which no two vertices are joined by an edge. The degree sequence of a graph is a list recording the number of edges that meet at each vertex. The residue of a graph is a number computed by an algorithm that reduces the degree sequence to a string of zeroes. Calculating the independence number of large graphs in general is believed to be computationally hard. However, the residue can be calculated much more easily and is a lower bound for the independence number. In many cases res(G)=ind(G), and it is an open question when equality holds.
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
J Daniel Obray, Utah State University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Jessica Swain, Utah State University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Michael King, Utah State University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Kaylie Carbine, Brigham Young University Social and Behavioral Sciences
January 01, 2014 12:00 AM
Michael King, Utah State University Social and Behavioral Sciences